Resources for Public Servants

School board members. Local or state delegates. State or federal legislators. If health, children's safety, community and education are a part of your platform this is the place for you to get up to speed on the issue of CO in schools.

Conference

Public service is often a thankless job.

If you have true concern for leading the charge on school safety, or children's health, or supporting teachers and workplace safety – the issue of carbon monoxide schools is one that needs tackling across the United States.

The key questions you'll need to answer as you take on this challenge in your community:

  • What are the building and fire codes in use related to carbon monoxide detection in the community I am charged with serving?

  • What are the current organizational, municipal or state laws related to carbon monoxide detection in the community I am charged with serving?

  • What types of, and how many, schools, teachers and students are at risk in the community I serve? (Include daycares, public and private educational facilities, churches and recreational centers that provide child care for any period of time)

  • How many of these properties have some form of protection against carbon monoxide – and if they do, how do they rank on the "CO in Schools Ranking Scale?"

  • Should a mass casualty carbon monoxide exposure occur (at a school in the community I serve), is my community prepared to not only respond to the call, but quickly and properly care for those that would be impacted? (Think hyperbaric chambers and emergency room accommodations)

  • Are the first responders in my community prepared to diagnose when a medical emergency call is actually a carbon monoxide incident through portable gas meters?